People

Note: I do not currently have funding to support any new graduate students at this time (2020-2021). 

Current Lab

Jess C.    Jessica Charpentier, Ph.D.

New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station Postdoctoral Scientist, January 2020- September 2021

Project: Rehabilitating the Northern Forest for Economic and Climate Change Resilience

Bio: Jess holds a BS in Environmental Science from Northern Arizona University, MS in Resource Management and Conservation and PhD in Environmental Studies from Antioch University New England. Her Doctoral work focused on disturbance-recovery dynamics and fuel loading post-wildfire in upland forests of coastal Maine. Protecting the Northern landscape has been the driving force behind Jess’ work. Her land ethic is deeply rooted in protecting the region’s most important landscapes while promoting the wise use of its renewable natural resources. She has a decade of experience working with land trusts, towns, private landowners, and public agencies on important land conservation projects.

Molly Yanchuck     Molly Yanchuck, M.S. Student

Co-supervised with Dr. Russ Congalton (UNH Basic and Applied Spatial Analysis Lab)

Project: Using remote sensing tools to study Japanese knotweed dispersal and colonization patterns

Bio: Molly attended Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania for her undergrad and graduated in 2017 with a B.S. in GeoEnvironmental Studies, a minor in Women and Gender Studies, and a certificate in GIS. She is currently a Master’s student in the BASAL lab working towards a M.S. in Natural Resources: Environmental Conservation and Sustainability with her advisor, Russel G. Congalton. Her interests are natural resource management, water quality, sustainability, and human-environment geography. She is developing her thesis around the analysis of water quality and riparian zones with unmanned aerial system (UAS) imagery. Molly is looking forward to discovering new ways to use UAS and plans to graduate in the spring of 2021.

 

Lisa Scott, Ph.D. Student (starting August 2020)

National Science Foundation INSPIRES Project: Using Big Data and Machine Learning to Predict Future Forest Condition in Response to Silvicultural Activities

Co-supervised with Dr. Marek Petrick (UNH CEPS)

M.S. Environmental Science & Policy June, 2016
Plymouth State University – Plymouth, NH

B.S. Environmental Science May, 2014
Virginia Tech – Blacksburg, VA
 

Past Graduate Students

chad  Chad Hammer, M.S. Student

Research Topic: Ecosystem service impacts and movement of terrestrial invasive plants in New England riparian forests. 

My research focused on non-native, invasive plants in riparian plant communities and their impacts on stream habitat and water quality.  I studied the mechanisms that allow invasive plants to establish in new areas and explored how these species are using streams as corridors to invade less disturbed interior forests.

Completed, August 2019

Chad is now pursuing a Ph.D. at the University of Montana's W.A. Franke College of Forestry and Conservation 

About Chad

Past and Current Undergraduates and Technicians

fieldcrew

2018 Field Crew (above photo, L to R): Nathan Rees, Chad Hammer, Monica Newton

Monica Newton, Wildlife and Conservation Biology Major (graduated May 2018)

January - August 2018

Research Assistant: Forest Structure and Invasive Plants in New Hampshire Old Growth Forest Stands

Nathan Rees, Environmental Conservation and Sustainability Major (graduated December 2018)

June - August 2018

Research Technician: Ecosystem service impacts and movement of terrestrial invasive plants in New England riparian forests. 

Collaborators

Mark Ducey, Ph.D.

Professor, Department of Natural Resources and the Environment, University of New Hampshire

Rebecca Rowe, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Department of Natural Resources and the Environment, University of New Hampshire

Thomas Buchholz, Ph.D.

Senior Scientist, Spatial Informatics Group (Missoula, Montana)

Nathan Furey, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, University of New Hampshire

Marek Petrik, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Department of Computer Science, College of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of New Hampshire

 

 

Latest News

Nova Scotia Budworm Trees

Long-Term Greenhouse Gas Benefits from Salvaging Dead Trees Balance Short-Term Excess Emissions

April 13, 2020

The next major eastern spruce budworm outbreak likely will hit Northeastern United States forests over the next few years, putting more than 11.4 million acres of forest and 94.8 million metric tons of stored carbon in spruce and balsam fir at risk. While salvaging these trees for energy or lumber increases carbon dioxide emissions in the short-term, New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station researchers have found that certain forest management practices result in long-term benefits that can balance these short-term setbacks.

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Read more about Long-Term Greenhouse Gas Benefits from Salvaging Dead Trees Balance Short-Term Excess Emissions