Upcoming Courses

Here are the exciting course offerings in the Medical Humanities for next semester.

 

 

ANTH 610 (01) - Medical Anthropology: Illness and Healing

Medical Anth:Illness & Healing

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2020 - Full Term (01/21/2020 - 05/04/2020)
Class Size:   35  
CRN: 54991
Intermediate-level introduction to medical anthropology through sociocultural and bioarchaeological approaches to describing health-related ideas and practices in cross-cultural, historical and ecological contexts. Focuses on human illness and religious experiences of disease and the end of life. Considers how suffering, diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and care are shaped by: religion and ritual; symbolism and language; age, gender and sexuality; families, social movements, and governments; and the worldwide expansion of biomedical expertise and technologies.
 
 
 

 

HIST 595 (01) - Explorations

Expl/Global Hist Ment Illness

Credits: 1.0 to 4.0
Term: Spring 2020 - Full Term (01/21/2020 - 05/04/2020)
Class Size:   30  
CRN: 56960
See department listings for semester topic. Course meets History major requirement for Group I, II, or III depending on the topic.
Instructors: Elizabeth Mellyn
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/21/2020 5/4/2020 MWF 11:10am - 12:00pm HORT 304
Additional Course Details: 

TOPIC for HIST 595 - THE MAD AMONG US: A Global History of Mental Disorder

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Madness is a universal and persistent problem in human history. Every society, past and present, struggles to make sense of it; every society, past and present, struggles to address it. It stands at the center of our biggest questions, from what it means to be human to how we should interact with each other in families and organize ourselves in communities. Each society answers these questions in its own terms and through a range of institutional strategies. This course examines the great range of beliefs human societies, ancient to modern, and from all over the globe have developed to identify and define madness as well as the methods they have employed to treat or contain it. Course meets the History major requirement for Group II.

 

HIST 498 (02) - Explorations of Historical Perspectives

Expl/History of Childhood

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2020 - Full Term (01/21/2020 - 05/04/2020)
Class Size:   35  
CRN: 56514
In-depth exploration of a particular historical question or topic: for example, the French Revolution, Chaucer's England, or the New Deal. Students should consult with the Department of History for a list of topics and instructors. Course meets the History major requirements for Group I, II, or III, depending on the topic.
Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.
Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Disc)
Instructors: Julia Rodriguez
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/21/2020 5/4/2020 TR 2:10pm - 3:30pm HORT 207
Additional Course Details: 

TOPIC for HIST 498 sec 02 - GLOBAL HISTORY OF CHILDHOOD & YOUTH

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Childhood is commonly assumed to be “natural” and unchanging. Yet historical studies have shown us that the meaning and experience of childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood are constructed daily, and differently, around the world. Exploring a variety of historical analyses and first hand accounts, we will consider questions such as: Did childhood exist in the past, or is it a modern invention? Are there "natural" or universal stages of human development? In which ways is childhood the product of society, culture, and history? We explore the impact of religion, science and medicine, social reform movements, government and law, markets, educators, parents, and communities on children's experiences in a variety of geographic and historical settings, in addition to learning about numerous ways in which children and youth have contributed to social change. 

 

 

Honors/The Mad Among Us

Durham   Liberal Arts > History
Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2020 - Full Term (01/21/2020 - 05/04/2020)
Class Size:   20  
CRN: 57112
Mental disorder is a universal and persistent condition in human history. Every society has struggled o make sense of it; every society has struggled to address it. But, what is mental disorder It is a disease? If so, of what? The body? The brain? The soul? Is it a chemical imbalance? Genetic destiny? Is it the wage of sin? The mark of the devil? The curse of a god? Or is it a social label or cultural construct - a name slapped on thought, feeling, or behavior that defies a society's definition of "normal?" This course seeks to answer these questions by exploring the great range of beliefs human societies, ancient to modern and from across the globe, have developed to identify and define mental disorder as well as the methods they have employed to treat or contain it.
Only the following students: Honors Program
Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Disc), Honors course
Instructors: Elizabeth Mellyn

Times & Locations

Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/21/2020 5/4/2020 MWF 11:10am - 12:00pm HORT 304

 

PHIL 410 (01) - Happiness, Well-Being , and a Good Life

Happiness and Well-Being

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2020 - Full Term (01/21/2020 - 05/04/2020)
Class Size:   35  
CRN: 56482
A sustained exploration of happiness, well-being, and a good life. Are they the same? If not, do any include the others, and can they conflict? What sorts of things might contribute to or detract from happiness, well-being, and having a good life? Comparing work on these topics in philosophy and psychology will be a key theme in the course.
Only listed classes in section: Freshman, Sophomore
Attributes: Inquiry (Discovery), Humanities(Disc)
Instructors: Paul McNamara
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/21/2020 5/4/2020 MW 3:40pm - 5:00pm HS 201

 

 

PHIL 447 (01) - Artificial Intelligence, Robots, and People

AIs, Robots, and People

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2020 - Full Term (01/21/2020 - 05/04/2020)
Class Size:   35  
CRN: 54397
The historical origins of the science of computation. The implications of the nature of information-processing for understanding the mind-body relation. Examines the possible social, economic, and educational consequences of the computer revolution.
Equivalent(s): PHIL 447H
Attributes: Environment,Tech&Society(Disc)
Instructors: Paul McNamara
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/21/2020 5/4/2020 MW 5:40pm - 7:00pm HS 202

 

PHIL 660 (01) - Law, Medicine, and Ethics

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2020 - Full Term (01/21/2020 - 05/04/2020)
Class Size:   25  
CRN: 56486
Critical examination of the diverse legal and moral issues facing the profession of health care. Variable topics may include: duty to provide care; nature of informed consent to treatment; problems of allocating limited health-care resources (e.g., withdrawal of life-support systems, quality-of-life decisions, etc.); patient's right to confidentiality. Problems relating to involuntary preventive care (e.g., involuntary sterilization, psycho-surgery, etc.). Writing intensive.
Classes not allowed in section: Freshman
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course
Instructors: Charlotte Witt
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/21/2020 5/4/2020 MW 3:40pm - 5:00pm HS 250B

PSYC 733 (02) - Drugs and Behavior

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2020 - Full Term (01/21/2020 - 05/04/2020)
Class Size:   20  
CRN: 53068
Introduces the principles of psychopharmacology and the effects of psychoactive substances on behavior. Focuses on the therapeutic and recreational use of drugs and the mechanisms of drug action, that is how the drugs affect the brain. Neuropsychiatric function and dysfunction are discussed as they relate to the use or abuse of particular drugs. Prereq: PSYC 402; PSYC 502; PSYC 531;/or permission. Writing intensive.
 

 

 

SOC 570 (01) - Sexual Behavior

Sexual Behavior

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2020 - Full Term (01/21/2020 - 05/04/2020)
Class Size:   72  
CRN: 52794
This course approaches sexuality as a social phenomenon. We examine variability in sexual practices, sexual identities, and sexual behaviors throughout history, across cultures, and throughout the life course of individuals. Particularly, we focus on the social control of sexuality and the extent to which sexualities are socially constructed. We consider the media and other cultural influences on a diverse range of sexual experiences and take a straightforward, non-stigmatizing approach to tackling controversial issues.
Instructors: Nena Stracuzzi
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/21/2020 5/4/2020 TR 9:40am - 11:00am

HORT 307

 

 

 

 

 

SOC 625 (01) - Mental Health and Society

Mental Health and Society

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2020 - Full Term (01/21/2020 - 05/04/2020)
Class Size:   39  
CRN: 55155
This course introduces students to sociological approaches for studying and understanding mental health and illness in society. With an emphasis on the importance of social stress, we examine the distribution of mental illness in the United States and identify the factors that help to explain mental health differences across social roles and statuses.
Instructors: Heather Turner
 

SOC 620 (01) - Drugs and Society

Drugs and Society

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2020 - Full Term (01/21/2020 - 05/04/2020)
Class Size:   40  
CRN: 56637
Provides students with an overview of drug using behavior as viewed from a sociological perspective. Highlights historical and current drug use trends, examines the social correlates of drug use, considers societal responses to drug use including treatment, prevention, and policy, and engages students in key controversial debates confronting U.S. citizens and policymakers. Provides a foundation for understanding of drugs and society.
Instructors: Karen Van Gundy
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/21/2020 5/4/2020 TR 8:10am - 9:30am MCC 230

SOC 635W (01) - Medical Sociology

Medical Sociology

Credits: 4.0
Term: Spring 2020 - Full Term (01/21/2020 - 05/04/2020)
Class Size:   35  
CRN: 54020
Health and Illness are considered as a sociocultural phenomenon. Meanings are attached to health and illness as they are influenced by our social values and our cultural beliefs, which to a large degree are influenced by available medical technologies. People's experiences of health and illness are shaped by a range of social factors (e.g., race, class, gender) and follow clear patterns of social inequality. A critical approach is taken to examine topics such as the social determinants of health, illness and healthcare; the social construction of illness; the medicalization of society; and the social organization of health care. Writing intensive.
Equivalent(s): SOC 635
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course
Instructors: Nena Stracuzzi
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
1/21/2020 5/4/2020 TR 2:10pm - 3:30pm HORT 215