Upcoming Courses

      Here are the exciting course offerings in the Medical Humanities for next semester.

 

 

ENGL 415C (01) - Literature and Medicine

Literature and Medicine

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Full Term (08/31/2020 - 12/14/2020)

Class Size:   30  
CRN: 16750

Literary representations of medical practice are used to prompt discussion of broad issues concerning medical philosophy and medical ethics, the image of the medical professional in the media, differing conceptions of healing in various social contexts worldwide, and changes in biological science and medicine on the larger society. Ideal for students interested in: Health Care, Biomedical Sciences, Physical therapy, and Nutrition. Prereq: ENGL 401 (with a B or better). Writing intensive.

Equivalent(s): ENGL 415A, ENGL 415B, ENGL 415E, ENGL 415F, ENGL 415G, ENGL 415J

Only listed colleges in section: Liberal Arts

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course, Humanities(Disc)

Instructors: Sandhya Shetty

Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/31/2020 12/14/2020 MW 3:40pm - 5:00pm

HS G34

 

 

 

 

HUMA 526 (01) - Humanities and Science

Humanities and Science

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Full Term (08/31/2020 - 12/14/2020)

Class Size:   25  
CRN: 15135

In this interdisciplinary course, students examine the ways in which scientific and technological understanding affects the development of cultural expression. Scientific, technological and environmental factors are sometimes discussed as if they are separate from human beings, but in this course we will consider the myriad direct, complex, and surprising ways that they drive cultural shifts and are then understood in evolving ways by cultures. Topics vary with instructor. May be repeated once if topics is different.

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Equivalent(s): HUMA 651

Attributes: Writing Intensive Course, Humanities(Disc)

Instructors: Ann Zimo

Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/31/2020 12/14/2020 MW 3:40pm - 5:00pm MURK G01

Additional Course Details: 

HUMA 526: The Undead Humanities: (Pseudo-) Science, Humanities, and Our Fear of Zombies

Centered on the question “Why do we fear the living dead?” this course investigates how the zombie phenomenon reflects the anxieties of western societies from antiquity to the present. In particular, it explores how the living dead embody fears that focus on our relationships with our bodies and the systems of knowledge and technology that we use to understand and control them and the world in which we live. The first several weeks explore pre-modern societies and how the undead were tangled in discourses of the nature of the body, the soul, and resurrection. The 19th century serves as a pivot where earlier concerns come into contact with the explosion in scientific research and medical experimentation. The majority of the course will trace the ways the explosion in medical, scientific, and technological advances that occurred in the 20th-21st centuries manifested in an explosion in cultural productions about zombies. We shall discover that we have a zombie for every fear raised by modern science--whether nuclear war, pollution and the environment, epidemics, globalization and the digital age, or 9/11. 

 

 

 

HIST 498 (01) - Explorations of Historical Perspectives

Expl/Pandemic Blk Death-COV19

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Full Term (08/31/2020 - 12/14/2020)

Class Size:   40  
CRN: 16934

In-depth exploration of a particular historical question or topic: for example, the French Revolution, Chaucer's England, or the New Deal. Students should consult with the Department of History for a list of topics and instructors. Course meets the History major requirements for Group I, II, or III, depending on the topic.

Section Comments: FULL TITLE: Pandemic! From the Black Death to Coronavirus

Repeat Rule: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Disc)

Instructors: Elizabeth Mellyn

Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/31/2020 12/14/2020 MWF 1:10pm - 2:00pm HORT 201

Additional Course Details: 

NEW COURSE*         PANDEMIC! FROM THE BLACK DEATH TO CORONAVIRUS

Pandemics. They bring death and disruption, chaos and fear. They have also been the overlooked engines of momentous historical change. Throughout history, they’ve transformed attitudes to health and illness; they’ve shaped social interactions and diplomatic relations; they’ve reformed institutions and reconfigured the infrastructure of cities and towns. They’ve caused some societies to rise and others to collapse. More recently, they’ve put in conflict modern medicine, civil liberties and state power. This introductory course examines the complex role disease has played in human history by studying key moments in which people and pathogens have collided. Our analysis begins in the fourteenth century with the Black Death that came to Europe across trading networks from the Far East; we proceed then to the great geopolitical changes Malaria and Yellow Fever brought to the Greater Caribbean between the seventeenth and twentieth centuries; from there we study the march of Small Pox across America beginning in the revolutionary era, before examining Cholera, the quintessential urban disease, in mid-nineteenth century London and New York; we then tackle some of the twentieth century’s most fearsome global battles with viruses, including the 1918 Spanish Flu, Polio, HIV, and Ebola. We end the course amidst the twenty-first century’s ongoing confrontations with the new Coronaviruses and pop culture’s imaginative apocalyptic clashes with zombies in World War Z.

 

 

ANTH 685 (01) - Gender, Sexuality and HIV/AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa

Gendr, Sex, HIV Sub-Sahara Afr

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Full Term (08/31/2020 - 12/14/2020)
Class Size:   20  
CRN: 16360
HIV/AIDS has been defined as one of the exceptional global pandemics of the Millennium. This course traces the rise and global spread of HIV and AIDS and the introduction of antiretroviral therapies and preventions in sub-Saharan African and its Diasporas with a focus on sex and gender. Includes findings on heterosexual and LGBTIQA individuals, couples, and communities and perspectives on: kinship, marriage, love, transactional sex, reproduction, contraception, gender-based violence, and activist movements. Uses ethnographies and health sciences databases.
Only listed campus in section: Durham
Classes not allowed in section: Freshman
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course
Instructors: Casey Golomski
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/31/2020 12/14/2020 TR 5:10pm - 6:30pm HS 107

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HIST 440B (H01) - Honors/Medicine, Society, Science, and the Law: Who Makes Your Health Care Decisions?

Honors/US Hist of Medicine Sem

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Full Term (08/31/2020 - 12/14/2020)
Class Size:   20  
CRN: 16466
Every person interacts with the health care system -- including you. In this class, students will study the interactions between law, society, science, and medicine to gain an understanding about how the American health care system developed and who has and does make decisions about health. Topics covered include vaccination, health care providers, discrimination, and epidemics. Course meets the History major requirement for Group I.
Equivalent(s): HIST 604
Only the following students: Honors Program
Attributes: Historical Perspectives(Disc), Honors course
Instructors: Marion Dorsey
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/31/2020 12/14/2020 TR 8:10am - 9:30am HORT 201

 

 

         
         

 

HIST 595 (N) - Explorations

Exp/Drugs Alcohol Global Hist

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2020 - UNHM Credit (15 weeks) (08/31/2020 - 12/14/2020)
Class Size:   15  
CRN: 16842
See department listings for semester topic. Course meets History major requirement for Group I, II, or III depending on the topic.
Only listed campus in section: Manchester
Instructors: Kristen Woytonik
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/31/2020 12/14/2020 W 1:01pm - 3:50pm TBA
Additional Course Details: 

This class emphasizes the global dimensions of drug use, production, and trade from the 18th century to present.  How have modern attitudes toward drugs and alcohol been shaped by the past? What strategies have countries used, successfully or unsuccessfully, to regulate or prohibit drugs? Using a comparative approach, we will explore the role drugs and alcohol have played in the economic, political, and cultural development of modern societies.

Topics will include opium production in China and international conflicts over the opium trade in the 1800s; indigenous uses of hallucinogenic drugs in North and South America; the development of tobacco and rum markets from colonial Caribbean settlements; a comparison of early 20th-century efforts to curb alcohol consumption in the Mexico, Nigeria, Russia, and the UK; the rise of cartels and drug smuggling in Mexico, Colombia, and West African nations; the crack cocaine crisis and opioid epidemics; and recent international debates over taxation, legalization, and decriminalization of drugs. Meets Group III requirements in the History major.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PHIL 410 (01) - Happiness, Well-Being , and a Good Life

Happiness and Well-Being

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Full Term (08/31/2020 - 12/14/2020)
Class Size:   35  
CRN: 16415
A sustained exploration of happiness, well-being, and a good life. Are they the same? If not, do any include the others, and can they conflict? What sorts of things might contribute to or detract from happiness, well-being, and having a good life? Comparing work on these topics in philosophy and psychology will be a key theme in the course.
Only listed classes in section: Freshman, Sophomore
Attributes: Inquiry (Discovery), Humanities(Disc)
Instructors: Paul McNamara
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/31/2020 12/14/2020 TR 3:40pm - 5:00pm HS G21

 

 

 

PHIL 447 (01) - Artificial Intelligence, Robots, and People

AIs, Robots, and People

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Full Term (08/31/2020 - 12/14/2020)
Class Size:   35  
CRN: 15092
The historical origins of the science of computation. The implications of the nature of information-processing for understanding the mind-body relation. Examines the possible social, economic, and educational consequences of the computer revolution.
Section Comments: Artificial Intelligence, Robots, and People.
Equivalent(s): PHIL 447H
Attributes: Environment,Tech&Society(Disc)
Instructors: Willem deVries
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/31/2020 12/14/2020 TR 9:40am - 11:00am HS 202

 

 

 

PHIL 440B (H01) - Honors/Who's Human Now?

Honors/Who's Human Now?

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Full Term (08/31/2020 - 12/14/2020)

Class Size:   20  
CRN: 16418

When we call someone human or a person, what do we mean, and what are we trying to do? How has the concept of personhood expanded or contracted to include more or fewer beings and why? Are fetuses persons? Are corporations persons? Are chimps persons? Who counts as a person now, and who will count as a person in the future? How and why are human persons subject to dehumanization? Readings and texts will draw from historical sources and contemporary philosophy. No credit if credit earned for PHIL 780.

Equivalent(s): PHIL 780

Only the following students: Honors Program

Attributes: Humanities(Disc), Honors course

Instructors: Charlotte Witt

Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/31/2020 12/14/2020 TR 2:10pm - 3:30pm HS 124
           

PSYC 733 (01) - Drugs and Behavior

Drugs and Behavior

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Full Term (08/31/2020 - 12/14/2020)
Class Size:   20  
CRN: 12350
Introduces the principles of psychopharmacology and the effects of psychoactive substances on behavior. Focuses on the therapeutic and recreational use of drugs and the mechanisms of drug action, that is how the drugs affect the brain. Neuropsychiatric function and dysfunction are discussed as they relate to the use or abuse of particular drugs. Prereq: PSYC 402; PSYC 502; PSYC 531;/or permission. Writing intensive.
Only listed campus in section: Durham
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course
Instructors: Elizabeth Caldwell
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/31/2020 12/14/2020 MW 8:10am - 9:30am MCC 110

 

 

 

 

         
         

 

 

SOC 620 (01) - Drugs and Society

Drugs and Society

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Full Term (08/31/2020 - 12/14/2020)
Class Size:   40  
CRN: 16551
Provides students with an overview of drug using behavior as viewed from a sociological perspective. Highlights historical and current drug use trends, examines the social correlates of drug use, considers societal responses to drug use including treatment, prevention, and policy, and engages students in key controversial debates confronting U.S. citizens and policymakers. Provides a foundation for understanding of drugs and society.
Instructors: Karen Van Gundy
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/31/2020 12/14/2020 TR 2:10pm - 3:30pm HORT 215
Additional Course Details: 

 
Durham   Liberal Arts > Sociology

SOC 625 (01) - Mental Health and Society

Mental Health and Society

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Full Term (08/31/2020 - 12/14/2020)
Class Size:   39  
CRN: 16550
This course introduces students to sociological approaches for studying and understanding mental health and illness in society. With an emphasis on the importance of social stress, we examine the distribution of mental illness in the United States and identify the factors that help to explain mental health differences across social roles and statuses.
Instructors: Heather Turner
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/31/2020 12/14/2020 MW 11:10am - 12:30pm MCC 245
Additional Course Details: 

 

 

 

SOC 635W (01) - Medical Sociology

Medical Sociology

Credits: 4.0
Term: Fall 2020 - Full Term (08/31/2020 - 12/14/2020)
Class Size:   30  
CRN: 13635
Health and Illness are considered as a sociocultural phenomenon. Meanings are attached to health and illness as they are influenced by our social values and our cultural beliefs, which to a large degree are influenced by available medical technologies. People's experiences of health and illness are shaped by a range of social factors (e.g., race, class, gender) and follow clear patterns of social inequality. A critical approach is taken to examine topics such as the social determinants of health, illness and healthcare; the social construction of illness; the medicalization of society; and the social organization of health care. Writing intensive.
Equivalent(s): SOC 635
Attributes: Writing Intensive Course
Instructors: Nena Stracuzzi
Start Date End Date Days Time Location
8/31/2020 12/14/2020 TR 2:10pm - 3:30pm MCC 245
Additional Course Details: